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Five Hundred
Courses of the Sun

The Unchanging Nature of Change
Mary Mann
Five Hundred
Courses of the Sun

The Unchanging
Nature of Change
Mary Mann
These cracks were easiest to see in the realm of politics. The French used to announce the death of an old king and the crowning of a new in one breath: “The king is dead. Long live the king!” The old phrase gained an unfortunate new significance when France’s first president, Napoleon Bonaparte, declared himself Emperor just a year after being elected.
People in the colonies didn’t experience the dizzying technological growth of the West, but they made it possible. Slavery made the West rich, giving free men the time and resources with which to invent. It sounds cruel, and it is, but—like an elected leader wanting more power—it’s not unprecedented. Slaves built the Egyptian pyramids, the Aztec temples, the Roman aqueducts. Slaves labored in Greece so their owners could have the time, ironically, to invent democracy.
In 2016, we've progressed to the point that slavery is illegal everywhere.

Unfortunately, the thrill of progress has a way of blinding us to problems that continue to exist. Today's inventions are produced in factories far from the consumer's eye, where conditions are often poor and pay is frequently bad. In a Shenzhen factory where Apple and Nintendo products are made, eighteen employees attempted suicide in 2010 alone.
Sound familiar?